1 in 2 women in the U.S. over age 50 will experience a bone break due to osteoporosis1

Don't let a bone break the life you love.

Make a pledge to talk to your doctor and ask for a bone density scan.

Make the Pledge to Talk to Your Doctor

What is the Pledge?

Osteoporosis is often described as a "silent" disease. Many women don't know they have it until they break a bone. That is why we are working to shine a light on the importance of talking to your doctor about getting a bone density scan.

By making the pledge, you are making a personal commitment to take charge of your health and better understand your risks for osteoporosis.

This pledge is entirely voluntary and will represent your desire to be more active about discussing important health issues with your doctor, in particular with regards to your bones.

The Statistics

Statistic 1
Bone breaks due to osteoporosis send more women over 55 in the U.S. to the hospital than heart attacks, strokes, or breast cancer.2

Statistic 2
After menopause, you are 5X more likely to suffer another bone break within a year after your first break.3

1 in 2 women in the U.S.
over age 50 will experience a bone break due to osteoporosis.1


Make the Pledge to Talk to Your Doctor

Select Risk Factors for Osteoporosis4-6*

Your doctor can evaluate your risk by ordering a bone density scan and considering several risk factors.

Advanced Age
Advanced Age
Family History of Hip Fracture
Family History of Hip Fracture
Low BMD
Low BMD
Low Body Weight
Low Body Weight
Previous Bone Break as an Adult
Previous Bone Break as an Adult
Smoking
Smoking

*According to the National Osteoporosis Foundation, the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists and American College of Endocrinology 2016 Clinical Practice Guidelines and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Additional risk factors include: Increased risk of falling; not getting enough calcium and Vitamin D; inactive lifestyle.

Talk to Your Doctor

Unsure how to start the osteoporosis conversation with your doctor?
We can help.

Don't let a bone break the life you love.

Talk to your doctor and ask for a bone density scan.

Make the Pledge to Talk to Your Doctor

References

1. National Osteoporosis Foundation. What is Osteoporosis and What Causes It? Available at: https://nof.org/patients/what-is-osteoporosis. Accessed March 20, 2018. 2. Singer A, Exuzides A, Spangler L, et al. Burden of Illness for Osteoporotic Fractures Compared With Other Serious Diseases Among Postmenopausal Women in the United States. Mayo Clin Proc. 2015;91(1):53-62. 3. Lindsey R, Silverman SL, Cooper C, et al. Risk of New Vertebral Fracture in the Year Following a Fracture. JAMA. 2001;285(3):320-323. 4. National Osteoporosis Foundation. Clinician's Guide to Prevention and Treatment of Osteoporosis. Washington, DC: National Osteoporosis Foundation; 2013. 5. Camacho PM, Petak SM, Binkley N, et al. American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists and American College of Endocrinology Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Postmenopausal Osteoporosis—2016. Endocr Pract. 2016;22(Suppl 4):1-42. 6. Department of Health and Human Services. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Body mass index: considerations for practitioners. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. Available from: http://www.cdc.gov/obesity/downloads/bmiforpactitioners.pdf. Accessed March 30, 2018.